David Leventi's Opera Featured in Time

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“In the English-speaking world they say ‘Break a leg.’ But in Italy, they say, ‘In bocca al lupo,’ which means, ‘In the wolf’s mouth.’ Because when we singers face the audience from the stage of a traditional, horseshoe-shaped opera house, with its tiers of boxes and galleries, we feel that we could be in the jaws of some gigantic beast with multiple rows of teeth, hoping that it will treat us kindly.”—Plácido Domingo, from his foreword to “Opera”

The architectural photographer David Leventi probably got a taste of this famous tenor’s words many times in the eight years he spent producing Opera.

For this project, Leventi shot more than 40 opera houses in almost 20 countries, from the tiny (Teatro di Villa Aldrovandi Mazzacorati, capacity: 80) to the mammoth (The Metropolitan Opera, capacity: 3,975). The work is being exhibited at Rick Wester Fine Art (with prints up to seven and a half feet wide) starting May 7 and is being released as a book by Damiani in June 2015.

David, who is the son of two architects, shot his first opera house while researching his family history on a trip to Romania. He is drawn to what he calls “the spectacle of opera. The combining of many art forms: architecture, acoustic design, costumes, stage design, voice, fabric, sound, music, etc.” – Myles Little 04/24/2015

Read the rest of the article here.