Border Monument No. 178 + Smugglers, January 10, 2012, 10:47PM

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Border Monument No. 178 + Smugglers, January 10, 2012, 10:47PM

1,400.00

Two photographs made 9 hours, 42 minutes and 20 miles apart

Limited edition handmade folio. 2 archival pigment prints, 17 x 22 inches, each, edition of 10

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Two-Print Monuments Portfolio
This two photograph limited edition consists of a handmade folio with two enclosed prints and a cover sheet. One print depicts Border Monument No. 178 and the other a group of three smuggler/migrants. The two images were made on the same day in a remote area of the Sonoran Desert west of Lukeville, Arizona / Sonoyta, Sonora.  The cover sheet includes a short excerpt from Taylor’s experience while making the photographs. Prints are on 310 gsm. cotton, rag paper and interleaved with glassine tissue suitable for archival storage.

Monuments Project
In 2007 Arizona artist David Taylor began photographing the monuments that mark the border between Mexico and the United States west of the Rio Grande. Aiming to document each of the 276 obelisks installed by the International Boundary Commission following the Mexican-American War, Taylor’s project echoes a visual survey made by the photographer D. R. Payne between 1891 and 1895. While many people have photographed the border, there has been no complete documentation of the monuments in more than 100 years. This volume combines his complete series with texts by curator Claire C. Carter, writer William L. Fox, cultural geographer Daniel Arreola, and an interview with curator Rebecca Senf. Taylor’s extensive notes on the monuments are also included. This publication encapsulates a seven-year effort across 690 miles that functions equally as geographic survey, typology and endurance project. In the wake of immigration debates, the drug war and a post-9/11 security climate, the project frames the obelisks as witness to a shifting national identity as expressed through an altered physical terrain.